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Results for 1700 onwards
From the Scottish National Dictionary
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  1. Back drawer n.BACK DRAWER, n. An apostate, one who abandons his former faith or profession. Sc. 1723 R. McWard forth such Back drawers, and Turners-aside, with the workers of iniquity.  
  2. Keuttikin n.. 1880 Dennison Sketch-Bk. 60: Her keuttikins wur meed o the legs o her man's auld drawers.  
  3. supplementary (2005) to Fortnicht n. off, and your drawers that ye used to change once a fortnicht?  
  4. supplementary (1976) to Glaum v.1, n.1. (Oct.) 586: The reverend carle glammering, graipit to get His drawers and bauchels, to slip down the 
  5. supplementary (2005) to Acroass adv. boattom drawer ae your chest-ae-drawers, ah cam acroass a photie ... an auld photie fae back in the 
  6. supplementary (2005) to Boddam n. Yours, Marie-Lou 43: Last week thair, when ah wis reddin up the boattom drawer ae your chest-ae-drawers 
  7. supplementary (2005) to Kirkcaldy pins, a flannel sark or a 'kirkcaldy strippet' shirt, woollen stockings, bed socks, wheeling drawers or 
  8. supplementary (2005) to Rake v., n.1RAKE, v., n.1 Add variant reck II. 4. Add quots.: Highl. 1984: Is there a pen in that drawer? Aye 
  9. Shottle n. drawer, in which small articles, money, trinkets or papers could be kept (Sh. 1866 Edm. Gl.; Cai. 1904 drawer under the ‘shottel', Kirsty produced next a pair of white cotton gloves and a pair of stockings cabinet or set of shelves, a division in a drawer or the like, esp. one in a shop counter, a till (Sc Shop-Table containing 64 Shuttles, and two Drawers, one of 20 Shuttles, the other of 16. Edb. 1722 Edb Scott Letters (Cent. ed.) VII. 280: Like the inside of an antique cabinet, with drawers and shottles 
  10. Ingie v.,” the local technical term for guiding the threads of warp to the hook of the drawer. Sc. 1934 Sc. Woollens (Oct.): The boy in front — the “drawer” — put his hook through the correct eyelet and the boy at 
  11. Bakin(g)-case n. dough is kneaded in the baking-case. Abd.2 1932: Bakin' Case was the drawer from the kitchen table or 
  12. Rumse v.2 manner (Sh. 1914 Angus Gl.). Ork. 1929 Marw.: What are thoo rumsan aboot there i' the drawer for? [Orig 
  13. Skibbet n.2 dial., skibbet, a small receptable or compartment within a chest or drawer, of obscure orig., poss 
  14. supplementary (1976) to Bagie n. dragged along to the main haulage road by drawers. Obs. Slg. 1842 Children in Mines Report (2) 479: We 
  15. Upgaen ppl. adj., vbl. n. Tam 105: The kist o' drawers in the upgaun had broken aucht panes o' gless.  
  16. Ball n.4 having selected from one of the drawers as good a pair of brushes as possible, the work began.  
  17. Obtemperate v. drawer is then out of the question, unless the accepter fail. Sc. 1865 Blackwood's Mag. (Sept.) 343 
  18. Semmit n. woollen semet. Ags. 1894 J. B. Salmond My Man Sandy (1899) 127: His seamit an' his drawers werena there. iii.: Yer semit an' drawers, Professor, are gey the waur o' wear. [Orig. doubtful. Phs. orig. the same 
  19. Recourse n. Recourse against the Drawer and Indorser, if the Person drawn upon, or Accepter, do in the Interim prove protested upon the . . . last day of grace . . . in order to afford recourse against the drawer. Sc. 1754 bears to be a foreign bill must, in order to preserve recourse against the drawer or prior indorsers 
  20. Valentine prop. n. chosen by lot by the opposite sex, the person whose name was drawn supposedly becoming the drawer's 
  21. Reemage v., n. the dresser drawer. Abd.1 1929: She reemaget in the crap o' the wa'. Abd. 1937 Press & Journal (27 
  22. supplementary (2005) to Lay v., n.1., Dmf. 2000s).Gsw. 1992 Jeff Torrington Swing Hammer Swing! (1993) 156: He'd be laid by in a drawer in 
  23. supplementary (2005) to Reenge v.1, n.1 drawers wi yer reengin. Whit are ye reengin for? II. 4. Add Phr.: on the reenge, On the prowl.Ags. 1990 
  24. Provide v., n. of drawers, “split new”, and ordered for the occasion. 2. Bed and table linen, or naiprie as it is. Holman Diamond Panes 61: She attended to the “bottom drawer,” which may have been a trunk, of course 
  25. supplementary (2005) to Redd v.1, n.1 drawer ae your chest-ae-drawers, ah cam acroass a photie...an auld photie fae back in the forties ... Sc 
  26. supplementary (2005) to Draw v., n. to my ain thochts, to pairt. I. 1. Hence Add variant draavers. Sc. forms of Eng. drawers (underpants 
  27. Calshes n. pl., drawers.]  
  28. Loopick n.); Ork. 1929 Marw., luppack; Sh. 1961). Sh. 1877 G. Stewart Fireside Tales 39: A very deep drawer 
  29. Luppie n. usually put in drawers or boxes. . . . The bairns were seated on round stools of straw, which, turned 
  30. Goblet n. Pictures 162: Drawers, dresser, jugs, an' cans, An, gobblets, girdles, toasters, pans. Kcb. 1893 Crockett 
  31. Towin v., to rummage. Dmf. 1873 A. Anderson Song of Labour 148: When townin' through the drawer. Dmf. 1912 J. L 
  32. Spoach v., n. wrang place. Bwk. 1958: What are ye spoachin in that drawer for? 4. tr. To look for, seek. Sc. 1847 R 
  33. Teer v.. Sinclair Agric. Scot. III. 317: Callico-printers, Drawers, Engravers, Cutters, Machine-workers, Dyers 
  34. Feyness n. feeling approaching certainty. m.Lth.1 1952: I've a feyness notion the buiks are in the dresser drawer. 2 
  35. supplementary (2005) to Scutter v., n.1 knives on your table, Nell,’ scolded Theresa.‘No, no. No.’ She scuttered at the open drawer, sat down 
  36. supplementary (2005) to Them pron. nocht but thair drawers an semmitsyon wad hae been a solid mover towards peace.Sc. 1991 William Wolfe in 
  37. Kist n., v.., Ags., Per., Dmb., Ayr., s.Sc. 1960), “two drawers with a sliding board in front” (Kcb.10 1941); (2 one's kist-neuk, to move from one's accustomed place (ne.Sc. 1960). See Neuk; (3) kist o(f) drawers, chest of drawers (Edb. 1872 J. Smith Jenny Blair's Maunderings (1881) 31). Gen.Sc.; (4) kist(fu') o Tibbie and Tam 100: The total wreck o' the furniture — except the kist o' drawers — was mair than thae had reckoned for! Mry. 1927 E. B. Levack Lossiemouth 32: A' 'at A hed wis 'er mither's kist-o'-drawers 
  38. supplementary (1976) to Burn n. 95: The market-place proper was paved with rough burn causeway. burn-drawer, a water-carrier, = (1). Sc. 1799 Edb. Weekly Jnl. (3 April): William M'Minn, a burn-drawer in Drumfries. burn-fish, a fresh 
  39. Cot n. in a wee cot-house On Kirsty's kist o' drawers. 3. Rxb. 1795 Stat. Acc.1 XIX. 128: Small tenants 
  40. Honesty n.. Lth. 1856 M. Oliphant Lilliesleaf xxviii.: I gave Lilly an advice myself to put it by in her drawers 
  41. Linder n.1 the paper lay. Bnff. 1872 W. Philip It 'ill a' come richt 148: Fower pair o' drawers, a dizzen o 
  42. Onerous adj.: When a cheque is presented to a bank there is no presumption of onerosity as between the drawer and the 
  43. Gip n.2, v. Fireside Tales 39: An old oak table, with a very deep drawer, containing . . . a peerie gipper. [Prob. of 
  44. Pink n.1 the top drawer,” “swell”, and see Dichty Water, Kelvinside, Morningside, Pan, I. 1. (11), Peerie 
  45. supplementary (2005) to Gaither v., n. table top....Ahch, a jist gethert thum the gither,Cleanin oot the drawers ye micht say.  
  46. Dambrod n. comb., v. i.: I have only to open the drawer with the loose handle to bring out the dambrod. Gsw. 1877 A. G 
  47. Intromit v.. Macdonald Malcolm III. xv.: Div ye tell me 'at Jean was intromittin' wi' thae drawers? [O.Sc. intromit, -met 
  48. Pirlie-pig n. ago there was a good demand for modern pirlie pigs. Many were modelled like a chest of drawers, others 
  49. Scunge v., n. (30 Sept.) 2: It's maybe been a scunjin' dog. 2. To rummage about, as in a drawer or cupboard (ne.Sc 
  50. Trew v. gud to trud [sic]. Sc. 1818 Scott Bride of Lamm. xiii.: That auld clavering sneck-drawer wad gar ye 
  51. Row-chow v., adj., n. o' circumvolutions. wm.Sc.1 1947: Don't leave the drawer all row-chow. III. n. A child's game of 
  52. supplementary (2005) to Semmit n. his 'simmit' and a pair of long drawers, smoking his pipe, ... Sc. 1989 Scotsman 7 Aug 20: The load 
  53. supplementary (2005) to Tea n. drawers. The Latin motto is as near as Edinburgh University classics can come to "You'll have had your tea 
  54. Pair n., the Shorter Catechism; pair o' drawers, a small chest of drawers (Bnff. 1900); pair of grains, a 
  55. Press v., n.., as in press-door, press-drawer, etc. Deriv. press-fu', a cupboardful. Sc. 1718 Analecta Scot A. Bain Education Slg. (1965) 196: Press doors and drawers to have strong hinges and turned knobs 
  56. supplementary (2005) to Kist n., v. Phr.: kist o providin, A bottom drawer. (Edb. 2000s).Fif. 1988 Alistair Lawrie et al. eds Glimmer of. At "hoose-fillin" the kists o' providin' (the bride's bottom drawer) were placed beneath the beds. I 
  57. Bun ppl. adj.1 of Olden Time 18: It contained a few chairs and a table, an eight-day clock, a chest of drawers, a 
  58. Box n.1 bed which folds up to resemble a chest of drawers. Now gen. known in Eng.; (2) box-cairt, “a cart made 
  59. Harnish n. for weaving back-harness, were mounted in such a way as not to require a cord-drawer. 2. Rnf. 1792 A 
  60. Shetland prop. n. Shetland sheep noted for its fine quality. 2. Sc. 1896 Fleming Reid & Co. Price List 36: Drawers 
  61. Range v., n.' the drawers, an' canna find it. 2. To agitate water in order to drive fish out of their hiding places 
  62. Spar n.1, v. spar. (5) Slk. 1897 D. W. Purdie Poems 17: She ranged, and better ranged, the drawers, And damaged sair 
  63. Sneck n.1, v.1, adv. rogue. Cf. phr. to draw the sneck above. More commonly as agent n. sneck-drawer, id. (Sc. 1808 Jam.; Kcb. xiii.: That auld clavering sneck-drawer wad gar ye trow the moon is made of green cheese. Ayr. 1822 Galt Entail xxxix.: Ye hae had that auld sneck-drawer, Keelevin, wi' you? Fif. 1862 St Andrews Gazette. Idylls (1935) 307: There's a lot o' sneck-drawers about Dumfries to clype a' my political indiscretions 
  64. supplementary (2005) to Ben adv., prep., adj., n.1 chuck it oot, or at least pit it away in a drawer ben the hoose! ... 3. (1) Add quot.: Cai. 1992 
  65. supplementary (2005) to Skirl v., n. joy of watching Kate, skirts held high to display long pink drawers, oblivious to all but the gaiety 
  66. supplementary (2005) to House n., v. new home. ... At "hoose-fillin" the kists o' providin' (the bride's bottom drawer) were placed beneath 
  67. Guddle v., n., nondescrip', guddlin' sort o' existence. Ags.10 1925: His claes were a' guddled up i' his drawer. Gsw. 1950 H 
  68. Haik v., n.1, rummage, e.g. in a drawer, etc. (Fif., Dmf. 1956). Cf. Raik. 3. To carry or drag from one place to 
  69. Natch n., v.1 Annals Lesmahagow (1864) App. 46: A better drawer ne'er clapped foot in natch. Sc. 1811 J. Ramsay Curling 
  70. Wap v.2, n.2: Wi' plaidin' drawers — sicken wappers Will winter vex. 2. To bind, tie, join, esp. by splicing, whip 
  71. Faik n.1, v.1 over the pages of a book (Sh. 1914 Angus Gl.); to rummage, as in a drawer (Ags. 1950 per Fif.17). †5 
  72. Flour n., v. colour required. These threads hung down below the warp and were pulled down by the drawer at the 
  73. Nicher v., n. horses to win oot”, meaning the money to be taken from the drawers in payment of serving men and maids 
  74. Gear n., v.. gear-gatherin, accumulating wealth; a girl's “bottom drawer” (Fif. 1954); ¶(4) gear-gift, heritage; ¶(5 
  75. Draw v., n., swearing. Hence drawers, cart chains (Bwk.2 1949). 2. Fig. = to agree, to get on together (Fif.10, Lnk.11. Spotiswood Hope's Practicks 540); (3) draw-boy, = Eng. drawer, one who hauls the coal from the pit-face to working (Sc. 1944 (per Edb.6)); (2) length of road hauled by a drawer (Id.).  
  76. Marrow n.2, v.' drawers. Abd. 1956 Abd. Press & Jnl. (26 Nov.): They wore . . . “marless socks”, a flame-coloured one 
  77. Wheel n., v.1'-wirsit drawers an' hose afore he wis weel waukent. 3. tr. and intr. To whirl round in dancing, to swing 
  78. Side n., v. 1949) 182: Siding drawers and locked places, which I left in the disgracefullest confusion.  
  79. Sark n., v.' drawers an' sarkets. Abd. 1916 G. Abel Wylins 81: Packin' up my sarks an' sarkits. Bnff. 1959 Banffshire 
  80. Get v.. Mackie Scotticisms 37: I can't get into my box. Arg. 1936 L. McInnes Dial. S. Kintyre 19: That drawer's 
  81. Sheel v., n. drawers, all the hardware, cogs, tubs, and a sheelin coug. Bwk. 1906 D. McIver Old-Time Fishing Town 13 
  82. Tume adj., v., n. a' the desk drawers. Bnff. 1970 Duftown News (31 Oct.) 2: Teemin' their dustbins on the doorstep 
  83. Raik v., n.drawer” for some time, when he took the loaded hutches to a point where a pony took a “raik” (a load of 
  84. Gae v. and search any container, e.g. a bag, drawer, trunk (Abd., Arg., Kcb., Rxb. 1953); 14. go off, in drawer. Sc. 1950 Weekly Scotsman (15 Sept.): There are other expressions which should not be taken 
  85. Heid n., adj., v. a piece of furniture (Sc. 1811 Edb. Annual Reg. lxxii.), used esp. in combs. e.g. desk-heid, drawers (1826–29) 34: She took her key from the drawer's head, on which it was lying. Dmf. 1846 W. Cross on the kitchen table — Sandy always kept it on the “drawer's head.” Abd. 1956 People's Jnl. (15 Sept 
  86. Lang adj., adv., n., v. farm kitchens, often with a folding table attached and a set of drawers below (s.Sc. 1825 Jam.; Dmf lang-saddle — a bed that folded up during the day, like to a chest of drawers in form. Gall. 1843 J 
  87. Lie v., n. 42: Lie! or Lie up! a command to stop addressed to a drawer, who is approaching with his hutch. (2 
  88. Gang v., n., to open and search through (a bag, drawer, trunk, etc.); 8. gang ower, n., a scolding (Uls. 1880 
  89. Shank n., v. of worsted, in the form of socks, hose, drawers and “sarkits.” 4. To fit (a tool or implement) with 
  90. Putt v., n.1 shoves or pushes. Hence (coal-)putter, a person who does this, “a man or boy who assists a drawer to take 
  91. Stand v., n.1., Rxb. 1971), drawers, etc. In Eng. only of weapons. Also used in coll. sing. Fif. 1703 E. Henderson 
  92. Redd v.1, n.1. 1898 Shetland News (26 Nov.): Takkin' da redder oot o' da drawer. Ork. 1958: Are du seen me redder, boy 

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Results prior to 1700
From A Dictionary of the Older Scottish Tongue
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  1. Penyell n.Penyell, n. ? Erron. — Penyells or drawers, curtains; Lowther's Jrnl. 42.  
  2. Blude-drawer n.Blude-drawer, n. [Cf. next.] One who draws blood from another. — The act … quhairthrow … Robert suld entyr the blude drawer of Robert Scot; 1566 Inverness B. Rec. I. 136.  
  3. Kelsounis n. pl.Kelsounis, n. pl. [Cf. Calsowmis, Calsons.] Drawers, underpants. — Item. ane curchshe. Item, ane 
  4. Laykyn n.Laykyn, n. (= MDu. laykijn, dim. of lay var. of lade box, coffer. Cf. Du. schuiflade, = drawer 
  5. Issie Issie, var. of eisie Esy a. (easy). — [The drawer] oblidged to work at any uther issie pairt of the 
  6. Liticall fire & ane drawer bed pryce iij li.; 1607 Edinb. Test. XLII. 326 b.  
  7. Talbent n.Talbent, n. (? = 18th c. Eng. tallboy (1769) a tallboy, a tall chest of drawers.) — Ane heich 
  8. Ondrawer n.Ondrawer, n. [On adv. 2; Drawer n.] One who brings about (a state of affairs), an initiator or 
  9. Crop-berar n.Crop-berar, n. [Crop n. 2.] A drawer of profit. — To ordane … William Cuming thair principall 
  10. Chottill Chottill, Chottle, variants of Schottil (drawer). — Twa great booth kists with ane cave buist and 
  11. Drawer n.Drawer, Drawar, n. [ME. drawer (1483), draghere (a 1340).] 1. One who draws or draws out (in various senses of the verb). [No] boucheour dog, drawer of blude; Lynd. Compl. Bagsche 194. Anentis. An implement for, or means of, drawing. Incontinent was maid ane instrument of tre, like the drawer brace, … flesch cruik and drawer, ane flamer [etc.]; 1652 Edinb. Test. LXVI. 129 b.  
  12. Spice-box n.. later dial. spice-box a pepper-pot.] A box for keeping spice in. — A spyce box with drawers; 1683 Inv 
  13. Pass-lock n. with two brass drawers, the lock polished; 1686 Arch. Scot. I. 180. A pass lock with a round filled 
  14. Updrawer n.Updrawer, -ar, n. [Drawer n.] a. A means of drawing up or lifting (something). b. One who draws up 
  15. Percill n.. Sardonien percell, sennon-drawer; James VI Poems I. 128/297. Petroselinum, parsell; Duncan App. Etym 
  16. Wannot tre n. drawers; 1654 Edinb. Test. LXVIII 7b.  
  17. Courtin(e n., thrie ovter vallons [etc.]; 1640 Bk. Carlaverock II. 503. 2. Attrib. with bed, cord, drawer, plading drawers with the irnes quhairwpone thay rane; 1646 Edinb. Test. LXII. 69. — Ten rowis of courting plading 
  18. Stringing vbl. n.. Stringȝng; 1672 Edinb. Test. LXXIV 203. For 3 ells stringing to my drawers; 1675 Cunningham Diary 62 
  19. S(c)hottill n.; Chottill. [Of doubtful origin ? f. S(c)hut v., or ? a dimin. ultim. f. S(c)hot n.1 (cf. LG schot a drawer, or drawer, so constructed as to fit into a larger piece of furniture as part thereof. (1) j par of 
  20. Pourtrait n. portrat caise of silver; 1667 Edinb. Test. LXXIII 8 b. Patrick Alexander portrut drawer; 1671 Rec. of Old 
  21. Pres(s n..] 1. a. A chest. b. A (? shelved) cupboard, sometimes containing drawers, for holding clothes 367. A presse with 8 drawers; 1648 Lennoxlove MS [The Duke of Hamilton] F1/165/1. Ane old fashioned 
  22. Lace n. Huntar Englishman silver and gold lais drawer and worker in the Cannogait; Ib. 794/2. Four greine velvat 
  23. Quhareupon interrog., rel. adv.; Bisset I 269/32. Four courting drawers with the irnes quhairwpone thay rane; 1646 Edinb. Test. LXII 69 
  24. Ȝal(l)ow adj.; 1562 Treas. Acc. XI 215. (c) Ane drawer of bukram of five bredis part grein part reid to yaillow; 1544 
  25. Instrument n.. Incontinent was maid ane instrument of tre, like the drawer of ane wel; Bell. Boece II. 511. [They] culd mak 
  26. Wan(e)scot n. Edinb. Test. LXXIII 224a. A wenchcott chist of drawers; 1703 E. Loth. Antiq. Soc. IV 28. (b) Ane 
  27. Tuth n.. Acc. VIII 89. — Many other stories I could report heir as … that of the tooth drawer and the lavement 
  28. Standand(e ppl. adj. drawer; 1683 Inv. in Donibristle Mun. (Earl of Moray's MSS) 6 (9-10 May). b. Standing on a base or foot 
  29. Kepar(e n. keipers of conventicles and with-drawers from publict worshipe; 1672 Ib. 89/1. Mr Jon King being … ane 
  30. Discharge v. the said Robert suld entyr the blude drawer of Robert Scot; 1566 Inverness B. Rec. I. 136 

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