Scottish National Dictionary (1700–)

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INRING, n. In Curling:

1. The part of the surface of a curling-stone which is innermost, i.e. nearest the “tee” (Sc. 1833 J. Cairnie Curling 135; Kcb. 1958). Gall. 1824  MacTaggart Gallov. Encycl. 280:
To inwick a stone, is to come up a port or wick, and strike the inring of a stone seen through that wick; now this is different from a common open inring — the two are often confounded with other, but they are quite different.
m.Lth. 1868  Royal Caled. Curling Club Annual 276:
“There's nothing to hinner me chippin' their winner,” Cries Tom, “just gie me the inringe o' the stane.”

2. A shot in which the stone being played is made to strike the inside edge of another and glance off it so as to hit and displace the opponent's stone nearest the tee (Sc. 1825 Jam.; Lnk., Kcb., Rxb. 1958), an Inwick, q.v. Also fig. Kcb. 1789  D. Davidson Seasons 169:
Wi' inrings, nice an' fair, He struck the winner frae the cock.
Ayr. a.1822  A. Boswell Poet. Wks. (1871) 197:
Now, Willie, here's a fine inring, Play straught, and rub him like a king.
Sc. 1869  Royal Caled. Curling Club Annual 276:
Should a treacherous bias lead Their erring steps a-jee, man, Some friendly inring they may meet To guide them to the tee, man.

Hence in-ringing, playing an inring. Sc. 1831  Blackwood's Mag. (Dec.) 970:
Wicking — or In-ringing, the prettiest and most scientific point in the game by far . . . taking an inner angle off a side-shot, in such a manner as to change and direct the course of your stone upon the one to be projected — or else to effect the same, when the case permits, by drawing off the said shot.

[In, = inner, + ring.]

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"Inring n.". Dictionary of the Scots Language. 2004. Scottish Language Dictionaries Ltd. Accessed 21 Mar 2019 <http://www.dsl.ac.uk/entry/snd/inring>

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